ALL EFFECTIVE SUBSTANCES ARE ADDED INTO THIS NUTRIENT. AND THIS NUTRIENT IS BRAIN REJUVENATION. 

Research

(From the Natural News.com network)

An important component in Brain Rejuvenation is Phosphatidylserine PS, a compound similar to a dietary fat which is highly prevalent in human neural tissue and is vital for cognitive function.  Phosphatidylserine is an important chemical with widespread function in the body. It is part of the cell structure and is key in the maintenance of cellular function, especially in the brain. It can be synthesized as well as consumed through the diet, but further benefits can be gained through supplementation especially in older individuals who need to improve memory and cognitive capacity.

Over 3,000 published research papers and more than 60 clinical trials have established that phosphatidylserine can rejuvenate brain cell membranes and thereby: strengthen memory.  The elderly particularly benefit from taking phosphatidylserine because aging increases our brain’s need for phosphatidylserine.  Aging creates enough digestive and metabolic inefficiencies so that it’s simply not possible to get enough phosphatidylserine in your diet.

Our bodies need phospholipid to build brain cell membranes that are fluid enough to release the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine, but luckily, our brains normally manufacture enough phosphatidylserine (PS) to keep us in top mental order. However, when we reach middle age, our levels of PS begin to decline. Because PS is necessary for effective neurotransmission, PS deficiency is linked to mental impairment, including Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimer’s dementia, depression and Parkinson’s disease among middle-aged and elderly people. Since PS deficiency is associated with these common age-related conditions, many experts believe that PS supplements can help improve, or even reverse, symptoms. According to the 2002 Bottom Line Yearbook,”Phosphatidylserine  is the only medication that’s been proven to reverse age-related memory loss in clinical studies. “Of course, this has enormous implications for people suffering from age-related dementia.  A recent study on men aged 50 and older with non-Alzheimer’s dementia found that a three-month regimen of 300 milligrams of PS daily was enough treatment to drastically improve mental function, according to Dr. Russell L. Blaylock’s book, Excitotoxins. These results add up to one thingNew hope for people suffering from age-related mental decline. The abilities of PS look so promising that phosphatidylserine expert and author Professor Parris Kidd calls it “the single best means for conserving memory and other higher brain functions as we age.”  After reviewing more than 3,000 peer-reviewed research papers on PS, Professor Kidd asserts, “The remarkable benefits of PS and its safety in use are now established beyond doubt,”

WE DIFFER FROM EVEYONE ELSE WHO SELL ONE OR TWO INGREDIENTS SEPARATELY, WHICH DOES NOT HELP. THE SUCCESSFUL NUTRIENT REQUIRES A COMBINATION OF ALL THE INGREDIENTS THAT ARE MOST EFFECTIVE

Many experts believe 300 milligrams daily is sufficient. The administration of 300 mg per day for eight weeks led to significant clinical improvements in patients with mild primary degenerative dementia. In a 1991 study of phosphatidylserine among people. 50 to 75 years old, doctors found positive results when they used 100-milligram doses of PS, three times daily. Researchers found a 30 percent improvement in cognitive function that included memory, learning, recalling names, faces, and numbers. They also found that some people with the worst memory impairment were more likely to respond positively to PS. This positive result is even clearer when taken for 3 to 6 months as seen in double-blind research. Placebo-controlled and double-blind studies have also shown mild benefits from PS supplementation when used for 3 to 12 weeks in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. In one double-blind study, the improvement on standardized tests of mental functioning averaged approximately 15%. Continued improvement has been reported up to 3 months beyond the end of the supplementation period. The Natural Pharmacy by Schuyler W Lininger, page 26.

HOWEVER IT IS JUST NOT PS THAT IS CRITICAL TO BRAIN FUNCTION. THERE ARE OTHER VERY IMPORTANT SUPPORTING NUTRIENTS THAT ARE REQUIRED TO TREAT MEMORY LOSS AND DEMENTIA EFFECTIVELY

 Acetyl-L-Carnitine has been found to be effective with Alzheimer’s disease. 1200mg daily can alleviate the decline in cognition associated with Alzheimer’s disease over 6 months and a year.  General cognitive decline (not Alzheimer’s) shows similar benefit in aged individuals at 1-2g daily. The benefits seen in these human interventions are not overly potent in any one regard, and fairly spread out across measured parameters of cognition. This suggests the mechanism(s) of action to credit are more general than specific in the brain. In regards to human studies on Alzheimer’s disease, 1200 mg of Acetyl-L-Carnitine daily can alleviate the decline in cognition associated with Alzheimer’s disease over 6 months and a year.  The benefits seen in these human interventions are not overly potent in any one regard, and fairly spread out across measured parameters of cognition. This suggests the mechanism(s) of action to credit are more general than specific in the brain A meta-analysis of double-blind, placebo-controlled studies suggests that supplements of acetyl-L-carnitine may improve mental function and reduce deterioration in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease . In these studies, subjects took acetyl-L-carnitine for 3–12 months.

Ginkgo leaf is often taken for memory disorders including Alzheimer’s disease. It is also used for conditions that are related to reduced blood flow in the brain, especially in older people. These conditions include loss of memory, headacheringing in the earsvertigodizziness, difficulty concentrating, mood disturbances, and hearing disorders. Overall, the scientific literature suggests that ginkgo benefits people with dementia. When used with other ingredients, Ginkgo improves cognitive performance and protects against Alzheimer’s. Current usage recommended is 1000mg per day)

Asian Ginseng, Current dosage is standardized to 20% Ginseng, 200 mg ). In studies assessing learning deficits (cognitive decline) associated with toxins or aging, Ginseng appears to be somewhat effective at reducing the rate of learning deficits. Many of the general cognitive benefits may be secondary to the anti-fatigue effects of Ginsenosides and Polysaccharides, paired with persistence causing differences from the fatigued placebo.  The addition of Ginseng to Ginkgo appears to improve the parameters related to accuracy, and the ‘relaxing’ reports of Ginseng may reduce frequency of errors in cognitive tests. Another study tested 200mg and 400mg of G115 in healthy young adults and found improved performance on the serial sevens subtraction task, a test for intellectual efficiency. Alertness and relaxation specifically have also been noted with a Ginseng multi-nutrient combination supplement when taken over a period of 12 weeks, when compared to baseline values.

Shankhpushpi (Recommended 30 mg ) Convolvulus is one of four herbs given the name of Shankhpushpi, and appears to be recommended for the same purposes such as cognitive enhancement and sustaining neurology through aging.  One week administration  appears to protect against scopolamine-induced neurotoxicity as assessed by acetylcholinesterase and oxidation biomarkers and beta-amyloid pigmentation.

Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica) aerial. (30mg).  In regard to its cognitive enhancing properties, Gotu Kola requires a few weeks to work and seems to cause an increase in neuronal growth (not how many neurons there are, but how far their dendrites branch out). This is due to activating a class of proteins known as MAPKs, which causes a release in a growth factor for neurons called Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). When looking at studies assessing the anti-amnesiac effects of centella asiatica, it appears to have protective effects against β-amyloid against streptozotocin-induced cognitive impairment, D-galactose induced amnesia and pentylenetetrazole-induced cognitive impairment.  When looking at studies investigating solely saponins, asiatic acid is able to reduce cognitive impairment in a model of glutamate excitotoxicity. In regards to the anti-amnesiac effects of centella asiatica, there appears to be components in the water extract (excludes the saponins) as well as the saponins themselves which have protective effects on neurons. Mice (young and adult) given centella asiatica daily for 15 days appeared to experience increased performance in a radial arm maze and Leaf extracts (water) have shown improvements in adult rat cognitive elsewhere.

Licorice Root; (30 mg)  One study assessing the neuroprotective effects of isolated Glabridin in diabetic mice that had healthy mice as a control group noted that 25-50mg/kg Glabridin given to healthy mice enhanced learning and memory more than mice given either low doses or no Glabridin. Improvements in cognition have been noted with concentrated licorice extract (Glycyrrhiza Glabra) when control groups were given these doses and compared to toxin groups; This optimal dose noted improvements in memory. In an assessment of Traditional Chinese Medicine that holds potential to treat disease of cognitive decline, Licorice was one of the top five promising herbs.  Some studies that use Chinese Licorice per se note a protective effect against β-Amyloid 25-35 proteins (associated with Alzheimer’s Disease) with 0.5-1% Glycyrrhiza Uralensis, and general protective effects with roasted licorice after Ischemic injury; the former study correlates with the known bioactivities of Liquirtigenin, while the latter hypothesized that the effects were related to Glycyrrhizin derivatives.  Licorice itself appears to be neuroprotective and, by protecting cognitive during periods of exogenous toxins or organic cognition decline, may appear cognition enhancing and appear to have some anti-Alzheimer’s properties.

(All research reviews are from independent sources as seen on Supplement.review.Examine.Com.,WebMD.com., and NIH OFFICE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS.